Documenter: Ramiro Merino Here’s what you need to know: The Council approved to award the bid to Miracle Playsystems for 14 shade structures for the Lemoore Youth Sports Complex in the amount of $176,355.  The 2020 Census report for Lemoore states that the city's “population balan


Fresnoland

Learn more about Fresnoland, The Bee’s new reporting lab

Clouds float above the downtown Fresno skyline on a clear day in 2019.

The Fresnoland Lab

Building a team of journalists to dig deep on issues critical to residents of the central San Joaquin Valley of California. We’ll explore everything from housing to land use to water access and quality.

Editor’s note: This page is no longer updated. To learn more about The Fresnoland Lab – and to donate – go to fresnobee.com/fresnoland.

Where you live can be life-changing. For the century and a half that the central San Joaquin Valley has been urbanized, policies and investments in infrastructure have created vast differences in opportunity depending on your neighborhood. A person who lives in Fresno’s Lowell neighborhood, north of downtown, has an average life expectancy of 70.4 years – 15 years less than a person who lives just a few miles north in Fresno’s Fort Washington neighborhood.

Fresno is, in many ways, at the forefront of many changes occurring in both California and the United States. As one of the youngest and most diverse cities and regions in the U.S., we are ground zero for what one potential future of the country could look like in twenty years. We are one of California’s fastest-growing regions, yet we haven’t figured out yet how to harness our growth to better support the communities and neighborhoods that have long existed in the region. Where we build new infrastructure, housing, and services says a lot about what neighborhoods we prioritize the most.

The Fresnoland Lab seeks to investigate, discuss potential solutions, and engage those that have the most at stake in driving the conversation.

What We’ll Do

We’re onboarding a team of four journalists who dive deeper into root causes and potential solutions to these challenges through digital-first storytelling, live video, multi-lingual engagement and events around the central San Joaquin Valley.

Our goal is to cut through the noise and help explain complicated policies and programs that impact the lives of residents in our communities. We’ll make sure the stories that matter most to our communities get told, while holding powerful people and institutions accountable.

This is our community, and this is where we live, too. We know a better Fresnoland for everyone is possible – and we want to help make it clearer how we can all work toward that goal.

How to Help

Donations can be made to Fresnoland Media, a 501(c)3 nonprofit public benefits corporation. Click here to make a contribution.

Share a Story Idea

Have an idea? Contact editor Joe Kieta at jkieta@fresnobee.com, or to submit anonymously, go to fresnobee.com/tips.

Fresnoland Newsletter

Our weekly Fresnoland newsletter features original reporting and commentary from Fresno and around the U.S. Click here to sign up for the newsletter.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do foundations and donors have any control over what is reported?

Editorial independence has been a core value at The Fresno Bee for nearly 100 years. We strive to deliver high-impact journalism in the public interest. While we value the support of our funding partners, outside funders have no editorial oversight, approval or influence over the content produced by lab reporters or other members of the Fresno Bee newsroom.

What other news organizations have received foundation funding?

The Seattle Times launched an Education Lab years ago that is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and City University of Seattle. The Miami Herald received support form the Rockefeller Foundation to cover Puerto Rico’s recovery from Maria. The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Vox Media, and other public media such as NPR and PBS have all accepted foundation funding.

Will this effort replace the Fresno Bee’s regular reporting on key issues in the community?

No, these are new positions. The Bee will still continue to provide breaking news coverage and cover housing, transportation, water, and infrastructure.

What’s with the name, Fresnoland?

Many regions have nicknames – the greater Washington, D.C. area is the “Beltway”, greater Los Angeles is the “Southland”, greater Chicago is called “Chicagoland”. The San Joaquin Valley is a mouthful, and more precisely describes a much larger place than what we frequently refer to as our region in the greater Fresno area, or the central San Joaquin Valley. So, why not Fresnoland?

The Fresnoland Lab

Building a team of journalists to dig deep on issues critical to residents of the central San Joaquin Valley of California. We’ll explore everything from housing to land use to water access and quality.

Editor’s note: This page is no longer updated. To learn more about The Fresnoland Lab — and to donate — go to fresnobee.com/fresnoland.

Where you live can be life-changing. For the century and a half that the central San Joaquin Valley has been urbanized, policies and investments in infrastructure have created vast differences in opportunity depending on your neighborhood. A person who lives in Fresno’s Lowell neighborhood, north of downtown, has an average life expectancy of 70.4 years – 15 years less than a person who lives just a few miles north in Fresno’s Fort Washington neighborhood.

Fresno is, in many ways, at the forefront of many changes occurring in both California and the United States. As one of the youngest and most diverse cities and regions in the U.S., we are ground zero for what one potential future of the country could look like in twenty years. We are one of California’s fastest-growing regions, yet we haven’t figured out yet how to harness our growth to better support the communities and neighborhoods that have long existed in the region. Where we build new infrastructure, housing, and services says a lot about what neighborhoods we prioritize the most.

The Fresnoland Lab seeks to investigate, discuss potential solutions, and engage those that have the most at stake in driving the conversation.

What We’ll Do

We’re onboarding a team of four journalists who dive deeper into root causes and potential solutions to these challenges through digital-first storytelling, live video, multi-lingual engagement and events around the central San Joaquin Valley.

Our goal is to cut through the noise and help explain complicated policies and programs that impact the lives of residents in our communities. We’ll make sure the stories that matter most to our communities get told, while holding powerful people and institutions accountable.

This is our community, and this is where we live, too. We know a better Fresnoland for everyone is possible – and we want to help make it clearer how we can all work towards that goal.

How to Help

Donations can be made to Fresnoland Media, a 501(c)3 nonprofit public benefits corporation. Click on the button below to make a contribution.

Donate now

Share a Story Idea

Have an idea? Contact editor Joe Kieta at jkieta@fresnobee.com, or to submit anonymously, go to fresnobee.com/tips.

Fresnoland Newsletter

Our weekly Fresnoland newsletter features original reporting and commentary from Fresno and around the U.S. Click on the button below to sign up for the newsletter

Sign up

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do foundations and donors have any control over what is reported?

Editorial independence has been a core value at The Fresno Bee for nearly 100 years. We strive to deliver high-impact journalism in the public interest. While we value the support of our funding partners, outside funders have no editorial oversight, approval or influence over the content produced by lab reporters or other members of the Fresno Bee newsroom.

What other news organizations have received foundation funding?

The Seattle Times launched an Education Lab years ago that is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and City University of Seattle. The Miami Herald received support form the Rockefeller Foundation to cover Puerto Rico’s recovery from Maria. The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Vox Media, and other public media such as NPR and PBS have all accepted foundation funding.

Will this effort replace the Fresno Bee’s regular reporting on key issues in the community?

No, these are new positions. The Bee will still continue to provide breaking news coverage and cover housing, transportation, water, and infrastructure.

What’s with the name, Fresnoland?

Many regions have nicknames – the greater Washington, DC area is the “Beltway”, greater Los Angeles is the “Southland”, greater Chicago is called “Chicagoland”. The San Joaquin Valley is a mouthful, and more precisely describes a much larger place than what we frequently refer to as our region in the greater Fresno area, or the central San Joaquin Valley. So, why not Fresnoland?

Statement of editorial independence

Editorial independence has been a core value at the Fresno Bee for nearly 100 years. We strive to deliver high-impact journalism in the public interest. While we value the support and partnership of our funding partners, outside funders will not have any editorial oversight, approval or influence over the content produced by the fellow or other members of the Fresno Bee newsroom.

Support our nonprofit journalism.

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